I have the answer to the hell that is the M25

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Bob Britnell could have the answer to one of south-east England's biggest traffic woes

We’re just back from a week away in South Wales, well, Monmouthshire which those of a certain age will know isn’t really Wales at all.

Later in the year we will visit friends in Lancashire, take a late summer break in Norfolk and a pre-Christmas break in Dorset.

What these excursions have in common is the M25. The need to get past London blights any decision to go anywhere from Kent.

It’s the price to be paid for living in the most beautiful county in the country.

When we’re away, we stay in holiday cottages and shop for local produce to bring home with us and, when you holiday in England, or Wales, you need to have a variety of clothing with you, ready for anything the weather has to offer. 

We, therefore, need a big car boot and this rules out coach or train travel.

I thought, what is needed is a means of getting past London without having to use the motorway and it occurred to me that we have the technology already: we transport cars and lorries under the English Channel on a train so why shouldn’t we do the same across land?

All we need is a network of trans-shipment hubs where we could drive on to a transporter, do the long stages by rail, get off at the other end and drive to our destination.

It could work for lorries as well, no business wants the cost of transferring goods from road to rail and back again, but what if you could simply take the whole lorry?

With hubs spaced so that everyone was within 25 or 30 miles of one this would result in less traffic on motorways, cut pollution and cut congestion, what’s not to like!

Of course, you would need a reliable timetable for the railway part of the journey.

Shouldn’t be a problem should it…?

2 COMMENTS

  1. These are just the sort of joined up visionary ideas which need serious consideration if we really intend to tackle issues of air quality and congestion in this country .

    Instead many local authority (sadly Canterbury included ) and government plans amount to no more than timid feeble unimaginative tinkering at the margins

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